360 Degree Panorama of Alamo Plaza

September 16, 2017

A 360 degree panorama of the Alamo Plaza as it might have appeared in 1836. The point of view is about 17 yards from the southwest corner of the Long Barrack (Convento).

Pan with mouse or move mobile device to see the complete scene.
Just to the right of the Alamo church you can just see the palisade over the low stone wall. The cottonwoods of the Alameda are visible beyond the palisade. To the right of the low stone wall is the kitchen which abuts the Low Barrack and main gate. The 18-pounder cannon is on the platform at the southwest corner. Next to it on the west wall is the blacksmith shop. The Treviño House (Travis’ headquarters) is the thatched-roof building in the middle of the west wall. The defense of the north wall consists of two substantial cannon platforms. Continue to see the north row houses, granary and convento.

Image rendered in Blender.

Advertisements

Panorama image on YouTube

September 2, 2016

This is an experiment to use the YouTube 360 viewer for panoramic images.

I can now do 360 videos with animation (although this one is static).

In order to view this on iPhone/iPad, you need to use the YouTube app.

 


Panorama images

August 30, 2016

Facebook recently introduced a panorama viewer which lets a consumer view a 360 degree image by panning the mouse or moving a mobile device.  The viewer requires an equirectangular image with a 2:1 aspect ratio and certain embedded metadata.

I created a scene in Blender with an equirectangular camera placed in the southern courtyard of the Alamo.

This site does not support panoramas but the scene can be viewed on my Facebook page: Alamo 2.0   or with a direct link to the post: Panorama Image (link may not work if you are not signed in to Facebook).

Panoramas give an immersive feeling–especially when viewed on a mobile device that can pan the image as the device is moved around.  They are quick to download and work on just about any modern browser that supports HTML5–unlike a game engine presentation.  Panoramas even support 360 videos.

An app could display a map with hot spots for 360 views or even use geo-fencing to pop up a view when the user walks to a certain place in San Antonio.  Adding characters would place the viewer in the middle of a battle scene.  Rendering in stereo for Google Cardboard would complete the VR experience.  I am pretty excited about the uses of this technology for presenting my model.